Life after losing your baby

Life after losing your baby

Photo of Rebecca Anderson

“After time, grief is a part of your life, but it is not your entire life anymore”

“You are going to lose your baby.”

What happens when your worst fear in pregnancy comes true?

In this very deep and personal interview Kara Peel, mum of three, talks about the tragic loss of her first baby, Lucy.

Lucy was born at 20 weeks.

In this episode of The Tough Mothers Podcast and Tough Mothers TV, Kara delves into her grief of Lucy’s death. She very courageously speaks about everything from how she felt leaving the hospital, to the all-consuming grief she experienced, to how she personally grew out of the trauma of losing her only daughter.

As baby loss, including miscarriage, is so common, I would like to advise that this episode may be triggering for some viewers and listeners. Kara really wanted to share her true journey with you as she is an advocate for talking about baby loss, the grief it brings, and the awareness we need to help raise to better support parents who have lost their child.

This is a must listen/view episode if you have experienced baby loss or love someone who has been through it, or is currently experiencing it.

In this episode of The Tough Mothers Podcast and Tough Mothers TV you will learn:

  • ✓  About the grief of losing a baby
  • ✓  The taboos and societal expectations that exist around this type of grief
  • ✓  What you can do to support yourself through your grief – learn Kara’s best model and strategies
  • ✓  What everyone needs to know about supporting a grieving parent
 

The important take-aways from this episode are:

  • When you lose a baby, no matter at what term, the grief of loss is all-consuming. Yet, even though it may seem impossible at the time, it can lead to tremendous personal growth Podcast [4.02], TV [3.32]

“When I left the hospital I remember how empty I felt. I had particularly empty arms because I had no baby to take with me.”

  • The 5 Stages of Grief are real and you may feel them all. However, grief is not linear.
    When you lose a baby, the grief you experience is your experience. There is no “right” way to feel, or order you must feel your grief in. Let it feel for you how it feels for you 
    Podcast [6.19], TV [5.49]

    The 5 Stages of Grief are a cycle that can include:

    – Denial and isolation
    – Anger
    – Bargaining
    – Depression
    – Acceptance

    Adapted from Elizabeth Kubler-Ross’ book On Death and Dying (full reference below in Mentions in This Episode)

  • Kara found a model “growing around grief” which resonated with her during her transition through her grief. She explains in detail: how it helped her, why it is so important, and how it could help others  Podcast [6.45], TV [6.15]

“I’d sit in the park and feel the sun, and it reminded me I was alive.”

  • Society has certain expectations of how you should handle your loss, and they are often not real.
    Find out Kara’s way to create your own expectations around your loss 
    Podcast [10.17], TV [9.47]
  • “I was a mother but people didn’t acknowledge me as being a mother.” Podcast [10.28], TV [9.58]

People are afraid to speak to mums about their loss. Maybe it’s because they don’t want to hurt them or because they don’t know what to say. However, it is important to recognising the mother, her baby and the trauma she has gone through. Kara has some amazing tips on what to say to a mother who has lost her baby.

“I craved for her name to be said – that acknowledgement that she existed.”

Mothers who have lost their baby may not have their baby in her amrs, yet they still go through matrescence, as well as coping with their loss and grief.

Matrescence – the transition from woman to mother – is one of the most life-changing transitions a woman will ever go through.
We are changed – physically, psychologically, emotionally and spiritually.

  • We need to talk about grief surrounding the loss of a child much more in society. It is real, and it is common. We need to raise awareness and normalise baby loss. Grieving parents need to be supported properly Podcast [14.03], TV [13.33]
  • Learn the 5 little words you should say to any grieving parent Podcast [17.34], TV [17.04]

Listen to how you can support someone in their grieving, especially if you feel uncomfortable or don’t know what to say.

  • Kara’s best strategy she used during her grieving process Podcast [20.09], TV [19.39]

Find out what worked for her and what didn’t.

“Slowly I started to get a bit of a sense of self back.”

  • Grief can lead to personal growth Podcast [34.01], TV [33.31]

Baby loss grief is a different journey for everyone. Don’t let anyone tell you what you need; you need to feel what it is you need. In your own time you will gain strength and courage from your trauma and suffering. Eventually your life will grow back.

“It lead me down different paths in my life I would previously not have been brave enough to try”

  • It’s never too late to learn from, and address your baby loss trauma Podcast [37.29], TV [36.59]

You will know when you are ready. You CAN get through to the other side.

Hear the full episode. Simply click on your favourite podcast app below.

Or hit play and watch the full episode on YouTube.

I would love to hear from you

What insights did you have when you watched this episode?

How could these potentially change your motherhood experience and life?

Leave a comment below and tell us about it! Many mums come here to find support, and your experience or story may help one of them.

Who is one person that would benefit from watching this episode? – Share it with them through the icons at the top of this article 😉

SUBSCRIBE, REVIEW and WIN

Be sure to subscribe to The Tough Mothers Podcast or Tough Mothers TV .

And YOU CAN WIN!

Leave a review for the podcast  or on my YouTube channel, as I draw a random reviewer each month to win an amazing Tough Mothers gift.

YOU ARE NOT ALONE! Get all the motherhood support at our village.

Mentions In This Episode

The model of Growing Around Grief

The 5 Stages of Grief by Elizabeth Kubler-Ross in her book On Death and Dying

An explanation of this model can be found HERE

Kara used her courage and artistic genius to start her own business upcycling old furniture to make it new again.

Kara is incredible! Please check out her work.

Mental Health Support Services

If the topics in this episode are triggering for you, or if you feel you need support, please contact you doctor or local mental health line.

In Australia: www.healthdirect.gov.au
In New Zealand: www.mentalhealth.org.nz
In the USA: www.mhnational.org
In the UK : www.mind.org.uk
In Ireland: www2.hse.ie

In South Africa: www.safmh.org.za

If your country is not listed please search “Mental Health Line” in google in your country.

 

Want every episode of The Tough Mothers Podcast and Tough Mothers TV straight to your inbox before they are released?

When postnatal / postpartum depression hijacks your motherhood plans

When postnatal / postpartum depression hijacks your motherhood plans

Photo of Rebecca Anderson

“I didn’t want my son to have a meltdown when I was out because I didn’t know if I could handle it”

Unlike most of us, Rebecca Anderson was prepared for postpartum depression. She had struggled with depression most of her life. So, when she fell pregnant with her first baby she put in place mental health measures that most mums don’t even think about.

“I thought I had everything planned out, if things were to go south with my mental health again”

However, postnatal depression was nothing like she had experienced before.

“It was completely different to what I experienced for the 15 years prior to becoming a mum”

In this episode Bec shares with us her story of deep depression and anxiety, and how she attempted to take her own life. She shares how her depression has affected her motherhood journey, and techniques she uses along the way to help support herself.

Bec is a wonderful, bubbly woman. You wouldn’t know she experiences depression by looking at her, or talking to her. Which is why this episode is so important.

Often mums (and dads) can suffer depression after having a baby, but are too afraid to ask for help.

 

In this episode of The Tough Mothers Podcast and Tough Mothers TV you will learn:

  • ✓ Why it is so critical to speak up if you are not feeling OK
  • ✓ How common it actually is to struggle in motherhood
  • ✓ What you can do about it

 

The important take-aways from this episode are:

  • Postpartum depression and anxiety can be different to any other depression you have experienced before  Podcast [3.48], TV [3.18]
  • Know your triggers  Podcast [8.08], TV [7.38]

If you know what will trigger you to spiral, you can actively avoid those things as well as put in place strategies for what to do when you are triggered.

  • Have outlets / releases Podcast [9.22], TV [8.52]

Whether it is exercise, socialising, writing, reading or me-time. Know what works for you to let you take a breath and step away from your situation.

Outlets are imperative in motherhood

  • Breastfeeding can be really hard Podcast [11.30], TV [11.00]

If you want to breastfeed your baby, please remember that breastfeeding can come with its own challenges. Be realistic that it might be harder than you think. Don’t put pressure on yourself. You, and your mental health, are also important in your breastfeeding journey. There is nothing wrong with formula, if it means both you and your baby thrive.

“As soon as he went on formula, I felt I was 20kg lighter.”

  • One of the leading triggers of postpartum depression is that mothers have high expectations of themselves Podcast [11.30], TV [11.00]

We must take the time to set realistic expectations for our motherhood life. Ones that are specific to us, our family and our biology.
The Tough Mothers Motherhood Preparation course helps you plan this.

  • The most important question that needs to be asked in motherhood Podcast [16.47], TV [16.17]

Please ask it often. Out loud and in your head.

  • Struggling in motherhood is more common than you think Podcast [16.47], TV [16.17]

You are not alone. That’s why it is so important to share your truth and your story with other mothers. You never know what someone is going through until you speak to them. talking can help you, and them.

“Every mum has something going on in her life that she doesn’t talk about.”

  • The importance of building up a support network before your baby is born Podcast [24.11], TV [23.41]

It takes a village to raise a child. It also takes a village to raise a mother. Please look at creating your village before your baby is due.

  • How to ask for help when you are afraid or feel you are not “bad enough” – and why this is so important Podcast [24.55], TV [24.25]

There is no such thing as “bad enough”. If you are not feeling OK please ask for help.

  • Dads can struggle during the postpartum period too Podcast [28.18], TV [27.48]

Around one in ten men will experience postnatal depression. We must keep an eye on them, and encourage them to speak up.

  • Techniques that worked for Bec during her postnatal period Podcast [30.53], TV [30.23]

Create your own toolkit of techniques that help you when you are not feeling ok. It is best to create these strategies when you are in an good state of mind. The Tough Mothers Motherhood Preparation course can help you with this.

  • What Bec wants every mum to know Podcast [38.55], TV [38.25]

Motherhood struggles can make women stronger and more confident. Be kind to yourself and others

Hear the full episode. Simply click on your favourite podcast app.

Or hit play and watch the full episode on YouTube.

I would love to hear from you

What insights did you have when you watched this episode?

How could these potentially change your motherhood experience and life?

Leave a comment below and tell us about it! Many mums come here to find support, and your experience or story may help one of them.

Who is one person that would benefit from watching this episode? – Share it with them through the icons at the top of this article 😉

SUBSCRIBE, REVIEW and WIN

Be sure to subscribe to The Tough Mothers Podcast or Tough Mothers TV .

And YOU CAN WIN!

Leave a review for the podcast  or on my YouTube channel, as I draw a random reviewer each month to win an amazing Tough Mothers gift.

 

YOU ARE NOT ALONE! Get all the motherhood support at our village.

Mentions in this episode

The book: I Wish Someone Had Told Me… – unspoken truths about what really happens to women during labour, childbirth and the first few weeks of motherhood
https://www.ToughMothers.com/books

Gidget Foundation Australia
https://www.gidgetfoundation.org.au

Mental Health Support Services

If the topics in this episode are triggering for you, or if you feel you need support, please contact you doctor or local mental health line.

In Australia: www.healthdirect.gov.au
In New Zealand: www.mentalhealth.org.nz
In the USA: www.mhnational.org
In the UK : www.mind.org.uk
In Ireland: www2.hse.ie

In South Africa: www.safmh.org.za

If your country is not listed please search “Mental Health Line” in google in your country.

 

Want every episode of The Tough Mothers Podcast and Tough Mothers TV straight to your inbox before they are released?

My baby was 10 days old when he vomited bright yellow milk – he could have died

My baby was 10 days old when he vomited bright yellow milk – he could have died

Exercise 5 - Talk

It is still really hard for me to look at this photo.
Two paediatricins has juts spent an hour trying to find a vein in my baby’s tiny hand for the i.v.

At just 10 days old my baby was rushed to the Sydney Children’s Hospital, by ambulance. It was the worst day of my life.

On his tenth day in the world, our very placid little boy, who rarely cried and was content to just feed, cuddle and sleep, suddenly projectile vomited bright yellow milk (and I mean like highlighter fluorescent yellow). We were all about to go to bed, and it was a while after his last feed, so to say we were startled is an understatement. His vomit was so intense and bright it could have been a scene from a horror movie.

“Take him to emergency immediately”

In my sleep-deprived state (aside from our baby’s newborn feeding schedule, his 21-month old brother decided this was a good time to form an intense relationship with his dummy/pacifier i.e. we were re-plugging it about 12 times a night!), I called the health line. Yes, in hindsight I should have taken him straight to emergency, but I didn’t. I am not going to change the story just so I seem like a more together mother; I am under no illusion.

The nurse on the phone didn’t even need me to finish describing the events before she said: this could be very serious. Please take him to emergency immediately.

I left Hubs at home on dummy re-plugging duty and drove my baby to the local emergency department. It was nearly eight years ago but I remember the trip like it was yesterday. Even just writing about it brings back the sick feeling deep in my gut.

We didn’t spend much time at our local hospital. The words “bright yellow projectile vomit” set off the same alarm bells there as with the health line nurse. Before I knew it, my baby was in an ambulance being rushed to the Sydney Children’s Hospital.

It was surreal.

 

The sick feeling deep in my gut suddenly got worse

Not only was this obviously really, really serious but I couldn’t even go in the ambulance with my baby because I wasn’t allowed to leave my car at the local hospital.

There are no words to describe the feeling of following an ambulance that has your potentially very sick 10-day-old baby on board. I hope you never have to find out.

The Children’s Hospital staff were amazing. In no time my baby was hooked up to all sorts of machines to monitor him. However, they couldn’t find a vein in his tiny body for the i.v. After several attempts, two paediatricians contemplated sticking the i.v. in my baby’s head!

I felt like I was in a dream. I couldn’t touch him, so I tried to comfort him with my voice.

He was crying and I could not do anything. It was heartbreaking. I was beside myself and I remember trying so hard to keep it together.

 

We need to operate immediately or he could die

At some stage a nurse brought me a hospital-grade breast pump. While I was pumping away, next to my lethargic baby (in full-view of the whole emergency department – all shame disappears in a crisis) she sat with me and wiped tears from my cheeks with a tissue. She told me gently that because of the colour of his vomit they suspected my baby might have a twisted bowel. They would perform tests but if their suspicions were correct, there was a chance that his intestines could be compromised already.

If they didn’t operate immediately he could die.

iI don’t remember much of what happened next. Except for the cold, dark room where they X-rayed my baby’s tummy after they injected hm with a special dye. I also remember waiting for what seemed like an eternity for the results. All the while my baby was just lying there hooked up to machines and I couldn’t touch him.

We had been away from home for over 24 hours when the news came. His bowel was fine. I felt a lot of things then but nothing greater than the urge to hold my baby. They disconnected him from the machines and I hugged him so tight I think I nearly squashed the tiny, fragile body I couldn’t touch for so long.

 

Not everyone is as lucky as we were

A few months later I received a call from my mum. Alexander, the young baby of a family friend was also projectile vomiting bright yellow milk. His family were going through everything we went through. Something I wouldn’t wish upon my worst enemy.

Sadly, Baby Alexander’s bowel was twisted. He was very unwell and tragically died.

We still don’t know the reason behind my baby’s yellow projectile vomit, but to be honest I don’t care. I still get to hug my boy daily, something Baby Alexander’s mum will never do again.

I hope by sharing this story even one family will recognise the symptoms in time to save their precious bub’s life.

This article is originally published in babyology.com.au

My book I Wish Someone Had Told Me… – Unspoken truths about what really happens to women during labour, childbirth and the first few weeks of motherhood 
is available NOW. As a special thanks, I have created a sneak peek into the inside of the book for you to enjoy.

 

5 ways to train your brain: Exercise 5

5 ways to train your brain: Exercise 5

Exercise 5 - Talk

It is a fact that, if you are human, at some point in your life the sh*t will hit the fan. If you’re a parent the odds are even higher. And if you’re a mother, let’s be honest, sometimes the shit will hit the fan more than once a day. #truth

While the sh*t hits the fan in our house quite regularly (I have 3 young kids after all!), something happened a few weeks ago that involved one of my children that was a little more serious. Read the whole story here.

In the lead up to this I had been practising 5 strategies to train my brain for when the sh*t hits the fan, because at some point it definitely will… and it did!

Below is one of these exercises. I encourage you to read the purpose of these exercises and how to practice them effectively by reading the introduction to this series prior to getting into the exercise.

Exercise 5: Talk

Hi there!

 

Congratulations and thank you for getting to the fifth and final strategy of 5 Ways To Train Your Brain For When The Sh*t Hits The Fan.
 
The whole reason I created this series was because the sh*t had hit the fan for me. And I used these exact strategies to navigate my way through it.
 
I then thought perhaps you would benefit from these strategies too (if you missed the previous exercises you can access them HERE.
 
Have you done any of them?
Have they helped?
I would love to hear your feedback. EMAIL ME!

 

Anyway, back to my original sh*t. It was a trivial first-world problem, but it involved one of my kids. If you’re a parent you can no doubt understand why it affected me so much.

 

Mumma Bear came out in full-force, and with one goal: to ferociously protect my cub.
So, while it might seem minor and insignificant to some, it was huge for me.

 

I have talked about the pink fluffy dressing gown photo throughout this series because that is how it all started (you can revisit that story HERE or join our private Tough Mothers group HERE to read the original post).

 

I have also spoken about my condensed milk, straight from the can, highlight… but there is something else that happened before both those things, when the sh*t hit the fan for me.

 

I called my friend, Lydia.

 

Lydia is wonderful mum who I have been lucky enough to build a deep and connected friendship with. In short: she gets me.

 

And I knew she would get my sh*t that day.
So, I rang her in tears and blubbered down the phone to her for at least 20 minutes. Lydia listened. It was just what I needed, and I am so very grateful.

 

Something fabulous happens when we speak out our thoughts and feelings without the intention of the listener fixing the problem for us. We start to trouble-shoot our own problem.

 

Talking to someone you trust is literally like a massive brain-dump. As parents we have so many tabs open in our computer (brain) that speaking out loud is like shutting some of them down.

 

If you have a wonderful listener (like I did) they only need to offer a small opinion or piece of advice (a perspective shift perhaps – see exercise number 3)for things in your mind to change and become clearer.

 

Sometimes it is the sheer act of speaking that lets you create your own perspective shift.

 

This clarity is actually a sign that your brain is rewiring and changing itself. You are using different neural pathways and connections to think things through.

 

I have written about the brain rewiring and changing itself throughout this series, because that is the foundation of the work I do with mothers in our Tough Mothers courses. 

 

Tough Mothers provides holistic support for women during matrescence (the transformation a woman goes through when becoming a mother) and motherhood. It’s where neuroscience and psychology meet philosophy and spirituality (in its true sense), for mothers to create strategies to change their own brain wiring through self-directed neuroplasticity, and create a fulfilling life for themselves.

 

 

Neuroplasticity is the ability of the brain to change its own wiring, and to reorganize itself by forming new neural connections/pathways. This allows us to adjust and respond to new situations or environments. Through utilising self-directed neuroplasticity we can intentionally learn (or unlearn) new skills, actions and behaviours.

It sounds much more complex than it is. In fact, it is actually really simple.
Like the exercises in this series. They’re quite simple actually, right?

So, don’t let the science scare you, that just proves it works!

 

BUT BACK TO THE BENEFITS OF TALKING:

 

❤ Studies have shown that speaking your worries and feelings out loud reduces activation in the associated brain regions.

For example, when a person feels scared, their amygdala is activated. This is the region in the brain that alerts the person there might be danger. However, studies have shown that if the person speaks out the word “fear” the amygdala activation is reduced. How cool is that?

So, talking is not just good for getting things off your chest. It literally changes your brain wiring and therefore the neural pathways between key brain areas.

 

❤ Studies have also shown changed brain wiring in people who regularly speak to someone about their worries. They saw neural connections strengthened and a significant amount of improvement in the people’s lives. Even over the long-term.

This leads to less stress and worry, and also to creating more joy. Amongst many other things of course.

Most importantly though, you are teaching your brain how to deal with problems not only in the here-and-now but also in preparation for when another bout of sh*t hits the fan. Which is inevitable. Because, you know,… life

Sometimes when we have immediate sh*t, like mine was, speaking to a friend can have a profound effect. However, if there is recurring, or very serious sh*t in your life, I wholeheartedly recommend speaking to a professional.

This doesn’t mean there is anything wrong with you or your mind, it just means you value your mental health, and you want to get out of the sh*t (no matter how big it is) quicker and more effectively – remember YOU can rewire your brain with the right strategies.

If you feel that life is not quite what you hoped it would be at this point in motherhood. Or you would like to create strategies for your journey through matrescence. Or you just want to feel better within yourself (you’re allowed to, by the way!).

Please accept a complimentary chat with me, Dr Jen, HERE.

I GET YOU!

I’m a mother of 3, and am in the throes of motherhood. My unique background in psychotherapy and 25 years of brain research (I have a PhD in neuroscience), as well as working in this space with mothers for over 10 years, means I truly get you.

I hope that you continue to use the strategies in this series not only when the sh*t hits the fan but also in every-day life. Because when you change your brain you change your life.

 

 Life is too short for “that’ll do!”.

Use motherhood as the catalyst to create the fulfilling life you deserve to live.

Love,

 

This is the last exercise in this series.

 

I will be bringing more info and tips to you via this blog. So, be sure to check back regularly, or sign up to get my blogs straight to your inbox as soon new ones land.

 

5 ways to train your brain: Exercise 4

5 ways to train your brain: Exercise 4

It is a fact that, if you are human, at some point in your life the sh*t will hit the fan. If you’re a parent the odds are even higher. And if you’re a mother, let’s be honest, sometimes the shit will hit the fan more than once a day. #truth

While the sh*t hits the fan in our house quite regularly (I have 3 young kids after all!), something happened a few weeks ago that involved one of my children that was a little more serious. Read the whole story here.

In the lead up to this I had been practising 5 strategies to train my brain for when the sh*t hits the fan, because at some point it definitely will… and it did!

Below is one of these exercises. I encourage you to read the purpose of these exercises and how to practice them effectively by reading the introduction to this series prior to getting into the exercise.

Exercise 4: Nurture Yourself

As mothers, we spend so much time nurturing our children, that we often forget to look after ourselves. Or maybe we just don’t have enough time.

Or… maybe we don’t make it a priority (I am definitely guilty of that!).

However, when the sh*t hits the fan, we can use it as a tap on our shoulder to remind ourselves that this is exactly what we need to do: nurture ourselves.

A good way to start this is to speak to yourself as you would to one of your children, if they were sad or in a crisis. Be kind and gentle.

Ask questions, such as:

  1. What are you feeling right now?
  2. What can you do for yourself in this moment to make yourself feel held and looked after?

They may seem like simple questions, but you need to give yourself permission to dig deep with your answers and be really curious. The more you can tap into yourself, the better your answers will be.

Then DO whatever came up for you in question 2!

Imagine you are wanting to give yourself a big cuddle.

How would that look for you?

For me, on the day of the great pink dressing gown incident (a reminder of that highlight of my life (NOT!) HERE), I really needed something sweet to eat. So, I dived into a can of condensed milk.

Mainly because that is all I could find in the pantry. But, oh mama, did it hit the spot!

I didn’t eat the whole can, ha ha ha, and I don’t always have sweets when the sh*t hits the fan for me, but on this day it was just what I needed. 

#Motherhood truths

Other days, I exercise – sometimes it is a vigorous run or workout, other days it’s a long slow walk with my dog. It really depends on what I feel I need. That’s why it is imperative for you to tap into yourself (which the previous 3 strategies in this series will have helped you to learn. Revisit them HERE).

Ask yourself questions like the two above, as if you are your parent or your best friend.

Below are examples that may inspire some ideas of how you can nurture yourself.

You deserve it Mama!

Self-Nurturing Ideas

  • Eat something yummy
  • Drink something you love (preferably not alcohol!)
  • Watch something interesting, inspiring or encouraging
  • Take a walk
  • Listen to some music or a podcast
  • Run, hit the gym or dance
  • Have a warm relaxing bath
  • Read a good book
  • Meditate
  • Bake or cook something you enjoy

NB: please do not overindulge in any of the “treats” listed. They are called treats for a reason.

The brain loves you nurturing yourself. It recognises it as a reward (there’s a hint there!*) and activates the reward centre of your brain.

Thereby the neurotransmitter dopamine is released which will make you feel more positive, energised and give you a feeling of achievement.

It might even make you feel a little bit happy *wink*

Also, new neurons are being wired together (in other words new neural pathways are created) because you are training your brain in new ways with your thoughts and actions. This will strengthen your brain to remember to nurture yourself again and again, creating a wonderful make-yourself-feel-good loop.

At this point, I would just like to say that all feelings are worth feeling. Making yourself feel good should not always be the end goal. Living in constant happiness is unrealistic. There are many lessons and much growth in feelings other than the ones we label as “positive”.

Please get familiar with them. Acknowledge them. Explore them. Just make the conscious decision to not live there.

 

Nobody is coming to save you!

You must look after yourself; for yourself and your children.

Give yourself permission to be kind to yourself, nurture yourself, and put yourself first.

You deserve it, and your brain will thank you for it too.

Love,

 

 

This is exercise 4 of 5. I will share each exercise one at a time, so you have plenty of time to implement it, and start training your brain. So, be sure to check my blog regularly, or sign up to get priority access.